Did you know you are ‘nose blind’?

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

It takes years to find your signature scent or a room fragrance that you fall in love with. Then, once you do, you can never actually smell it on yourself. You’ve probably noticed that some people dismiss a compliment on their perfume or you may have done this yourself and you may even think you are slightly mad that you cannot smell these scents anymore. You’re not.

A cognitive psychologist at Monell Chemical Senses Center, has spent 20 years or more researching scent memory and what happen which they refer to as “nose blindness.” When you first smell an odour, your scent receptors send a message to your brain and it’s limbic system, which determines how you will process and feel about that particular smell. The receptors in your nose essentially turn off after around two breaths, and the scent—no matter how strong will start to fade. An example of a study conducted where people were given a pine-scented air freshener for three weeks. They would ask, ‘Are you sure it’s working?”

Experts and scientists don’t know why we become used to smells, but they know that we do. It is how we can easily pick up on unexpected or strange scents in our homes. You may notice how a friend’s house smells and you never notice the way your own home smells. It’s why people go on Holiday and come back and say, ‘Oh, it’s so musty in here — I’d better open some windows!’ Now there’s a reason to buy lots of scented candles and reed diffusers if ever we heard one and we now have our scented room Mists to help with the effects of ‘nose blindness’.

More to explorer

Smell and Memory

Smell and Memory

The sense of smell is closely linked with memory